Nerve Entrapment

Nerve entrapment occurs when there is direct pressure on a nerve which can cause pain, burning sensation, numbness, or weakness. Nerve injury may occur anywhere along the nerve’s course, peripheral nerve compression/entrapment usually occurs at specific locations. Direct pressure on the nerve may occur at fibroosseous or fibromusclar tunnels or where the never penetrates the muscles. The diagnosis is made by taking a detailed history, performing a physical exam, and may require further imaging. Imaging that may be helpful to delinate causes are Ultrasound, MRI, CT scans, or EMGs. There are many areas throughout the body where nerves may become entrapment, examples include: median neuropathy, suprascapular nerve compression, golfer’s elbow, tennis elbow, tarsal tunnel syndrome, piriformis syndrome, Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment (ACNES), cubital tunnel syndrome, and many more.

Treatment options include bracing, ice, heat, rest, stretching, physical therapy, rest, injection therapy, and potentially surgery. Several neuropathic medication can help lessen symptoms and “calm” the nerve.